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Case Study: Salt Cedar

Posted on 9.7.2017

Saltcedar is a serious problem in the southwest, where water is scarce, because it uses very large amounts of water. A full grown tree can use up to 300 gallons of water per day. This species can lower the water … Continue Reading

Tamarix Ramosissima: Salt Cedar

Posted on 9.7.2017

Tamarix ramosissima is a rampantly invasive shrub that has dominated riparian zones of arid climates. A massive invasion of T. ramosissmia in the western United States has dominated over a million acres. Typically found in conjunction with other Tamarix species … Continue Reading

Chinese Tallow: A Threat to Texas’ Forests. Fourth of the “Dirty Dozen”

Posted on 9.7.2017

It is estimated that 100 million acres in the United States are already affected by invasive exotic plants. This acreage increases annually by an area twice the size of Delaware. Although the acreage of exotic plants in Texas is not … Continue Reading

INVASIVE SPECIES

Posted on 9.7.2017

Control of non-native plant or tree species is a component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife (PFW) program. The PFW program works with private landowners across the region to control and eradicate invasive vegetation … Continue Reading

Western Juniper – Its Impact and Management in Oregon Rangelands

Posted on 9.7.2017

As has so often been said, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Individual western juniper trees can be magnificent to the eye, and a juniper forest in a landscape setting has a unique beauty. However, these juniper forests … Continue Reading

Estimating Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) Biomass in Northeastern Kansas

Posted on 9.7.2017

Eastern Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) has been growing rapidly across the United States; and Kansas’ Tall Grass Prairie in particular (Norris, Johnson, Blair, 2001). This decreases the amount of both prairie and crop land across the state. Its presence in the … Continue Reading

The Thirsty Tree: Confronting Invasive Salt Cedar in the American Southwest

Posted on 9.7.2017

Salt cedar trees grow rampantly in the Middle East, Asia, and parts of Africa, accustomed to harsh landscapes with little rain. They first appeared on the East Coast of America in the early 1800s, carried over the sea and sold … Continue Reading

Saltcedar: Is Burning an Option?

Posted on 9.7.2017

Saltcedar, an invasive plant genus, is difficult to eliminate. A 2001–2002 research project, partially funded by the Joint Fire Science Program, investigated burning as a tool to combat the growth and spread of salt cedar in Western riparian environments. It … Continue Reading